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Long Beach

Reverse Mortgages of Southern California services Long Beach Homeowners

Reverse Mortgages of Southern California has earned a reputation for being an established reverse mortgage company serving the greater Los Angeles area, including Long Beach, in the form of reverse mortgages, HECM, reverse mortgage loans, home equity conversion mortgages, HECM for purchase, mortgage loans, mortgage refinancing, home equity loans and adjustable rate mortgages that current clients have come to rely on. We have been proudly serving Long Beach  and the southern California area since 2005.

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About the City of Long Beach

Long Beach is a city situated in Los Angeles County in Southern California, on the Pacific coast of the United States. The city is the 36th-largest city in the nation and the seventh-largest in California. As of 2012, its population was 467,892. In addition, Long Beach is the second largest city within Greater Los Angeles Area, after Los Angeles, and a principal city of the Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana metropolitan area. The city is a dominant maritime center of the United States. The Port of Long Beach is the United States’ second busiest container port and one of the world’s largest shipping ports. The city also maintains a large oil industry with the substance being found both underground and offshore. Manufacturing sectors include those in aircraft, car parts, electronic and audiovisual equipment, and home furnishings. It is also home to headquarters for corporations including Epson America, Molina Healthcare, and SCAN Health Plan. Downtown Long Beach is located approximately 25 miles (40 kilometers) south of Downtown Los Angeles, though the two cities border each other for several miles on Long Beach’s southwestern portion. Long Beach borders Orange County on its southeast edge.

Long Beach, depending on the reporting location, has a Mediterranean climate, with strong semi-arid climate characteristics. Days in Long Beach, as in Southern California in general, are mostly sunny. Temperatures recorded at the weather station at the Long Beach Airport, 4.0 miles (6.4 kilometers) inland from the ocean, range more greatly than those along the immediate coast. During the summer months, low clouds and fog occur frequently, developing overnight and blanketing the area on many mornings. This fog usually clears by the afternoon, and a westerly sea breeze often develops, keeping temperatures mild. Heat and humidity rarely coincide, making heat waves more tolerable than they would be otherwise. Long Beach’s geographic location directly east of the Palos Verdes Peninsula, paired with its mostly south facing coastline, results in the city having significantly different weather patterns than coastal communities to the north and south. The 1200′ Palos Verdes hills block east to west airflow and, with it, a significant amount of the coastal moisture that marks other Los Angeles County coastal cities, such as Manhattan Beach and Santa Monica. As in most locations in Southern California, rainfall occurs largely during the winter months. Storms can bring heavy rainfall.

Long Beach suffers from some of the worst air pollution in the entire United States. Most of the city is in close proximity to the twin ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, and the prevailing westerly-to-west-south-westerly winds bring a large portion of the twin ports’ air pollution directly into Long Beach before dispersing it northward then eastward. Heavy pollution sources at the ports include the ships themselves, which burn high-sulfur, high-soot-producing bunker fuel to maintain internal electrical power while docked, as well as heavy diesel pollution from drayage trucks at the ports, and short-haul tractor-trailer trucks ferrying cargo from the ports to inland warehousing, rail yards, and shipping centers. Long-term average levels of toxic air pollutants (and the corresponding carcinogenic risk they create) can be two to three times higher in and around Long Beach, and in downwind areas to the east, than in other parts of the Los Angeles metropolitan area, such as the Westside, San Fernando Valley, or San Gabriel Valley. While overall regional pollution in the Los Angeles metropolitan area has declined in the last decade, pollution levels remain dangerously high in much of Long Beach due to the port pollution, with diesel exhaust from ships, trains, and trucks as the largest sources. Additionally, the Long Beach area is directly downwind of several of the South Bay oil refineries. Any refinery process or upset that results in the atmospheric release of refinery by-products (commonly sulfur dioxide) will usually impact air in Long Beach due to the west-south-westerly prevailing wind. Air quality events where large portions of the City are affected by strong-smelling refinery gas releases occur several times a year, although they largely go unreported.

The 2010 United States Census reported that Long Beach had a population of 462,257. The population density was 9,191.3 people per square mile. The racial makeup of Long Beach was 213,066 (46.1%) White, 62,603 (13.5%) Black or African American (U.S. Census), 3,458 (0.7%) Native American, 59,496 (12.9%) Asian (4.5% Filipino, 0.9% Vietnamese, 0.6% Chinese, 0.6% Japanese, 0.4% Indian, 0.4% Korean, and 5.2% Other Asian), 5,253 (1.1%) Pacific Islander (0.8% Samoan, 0.1% Guamanian, 0.1% Native Hawaiian, 0.1% Other Pacific Islander), 93,930 (20.3%) from other races, and 24,451 (5.3%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 188,412 persons (40.8%). 32.9% of the city’s population was of Mexican heritage. Non-Hispanic Whites were 29.4% of the population in 2010, down from 86.2% in 1970. The Census reported that 453,980 people (98.2% of the population) lived in households, 5,321 (1.2%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 2,956 (0.6%) were institutionalized.

The City of Long Beach is a full-service charter city and is governed by nine City Council members, who are elected by district, and the Mayor, who is elected at-large since a citywide initiative passed in 1988. The City Attorney, City Auditor, and City Prosecutor are also elected positions. The City is supported by a budget of $2.3 billion with more than 5,500 employees. Long Beach was first incorporated in 1888 with 59 buildings and a new school. Nine years later, dissatisfaction with prohibition and high taxes led to an abortive and short-lived disincorporation. Before the year 1897 was out, the citizens voted to reincorporate, and the 1897 incorporation is shown on the city seal. The Long Beach Police Department provides law enforcement for the City of Long Beach. The Long Beach Fire Department provides Fire Suppression services for the City of Long Beach.

Source: Long Beach on Wikipedia